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Posts Tagged ‘ANSI’

ASSE Releases Several New Safety Standards

Friday, March 13th, 2015

The American Society of Safety Engineers has released several new safety standards, including: ANSI/ASSE Z359.11-2014 Safety Requirements for Full Body Harnesses; ANSI/ASSE Z359.14-2014 Safety Requirements for Self-Retracting Devices for Personal Fall Arrest & Rescue Systems; ANSI/ASSE Z359.15-2014 Safety Requirements for Single Anchor Lifelines and Fall Arresters for Personal Fall Arrest Systems; ANSI/ASSE A10.24-2014 Roofing Safety Requirements for Low-Sloped Roofs; and ANSI/ASSE A10.44-2014 Control of Energy Sources (Lockout/Tagout) for Construction & Demolition Operations. You can find ASSE’s official announcement, and links to the standards, at: http://ow.ly/KgfJW

Shaun Reed and Scotty Nelson Attempt to Establish the First Free Ascent of The Unemployment Line on Mt. Broderick

Monday, November 3rd, 2014

Shaun Reed, Mechanical Engineer, Certified Rope Access Technician and recreational rock climber and his friend Scotty Nelson train and make an effort to establish the first free ascent of ,The Unemployment Line, an aid route on Mt. Broderick in Yosemite. In addition to his rock climbing pursuits, Shaun recently attended the ANSI Z359 meeting on Fall Protection in Chicago representing the Bureau of Reclamation.

The article and embedded video at the link below, show his commitment to achieving huge challenges in the vertical world! Will he free the route on Mt. Broderick? Click on the link below to find out!

Train Smarter: Scotty and Shaun’s Moment of Truth in Yosemite – Never Stop Exploring
neverstopexploring.com

What does it take to establish a first free ascent (FFA) in Yosemite Valley? Last November, friends Scotty Nelson and Shaun Reed, recreational climbers from…

PMI is Working Hard for You!

Friday, October 31st, 2014

PMI is working hard for you, staying abreast of standards and regulations that affect fall protection and rope access. This week, Jeff Bowles is carrying PMI’s vote at ANSI Z359 meetings in Chicago. Loui McCurley is also on hand, representing SPRAT. See the link below for full article.

http://ehsworks1.blogspot.com/2014/10/z359-committee-continues-important-work.html

Z359 Committee Continues Important Work to Prevent Occupational Falls |…
ehsworks1.blogspot.com

Are You Concerned About the Future of Fall Protection or Rope Access Standards in the US?

Wednesday, October 8th, 2014

Are you concerned about the future of fall protection or rope access standards in the United States? If so, consider attending the next meeting of the ANSI Z359 Accredited Standards Committee (ASC) for Fall Arrest/Protection on October 28-30, 2014 in Chicago. Pre-registration is required – check http://lnkd.in/b4zjnJV for more information.


Z359 COMMITTEE MEETING | American Society of Safety Engineers
www.asse.org

FALL PROTECTION AND RELATED SYSTEMS AN ANSI ACCREDITED STANDARDS COMMITTEE Z359 Full…

PMI Employees Attend ANSI/ASSE Z359 Consensus Standards Meeting

Thursday, March 27th, 2014

PMI representatives Kim Hunter (Quality Assurance) and Jeffery Bowles (Industry Relations) recently attended the ANSI/ASSE Z359 consensus standards meeting in Boulder, Colorado to discuss the future of vertical lifelines, PPE, and rescue equipment as they relate to professional work at height. Loui McCurley also attended the meeting, on behalf of the Society of Professional Rope Access Technicians (SPRAT). ANSI Z359 Fall Protection Code is the go-to resource for modern fall protection, and provides a baseline for some PMI Life Safety Ropes and Equipment, as well as Vertical Rescue Solutions training curriculum.

New ANSI Standards for Rescue at Height

Monday, February 16th, 2009

In 1997 a 26 year old man in Omaha, Nebraska fell while performing maintenance work on the side of a structure. Fortunately, the man was wearing a fall arrest system and his fall was successfully arrested, leaving him suspended in his safety harness. A co-worker and other rescuers quickly lowered the fallen worker to the ground and transported him to a medical facility where he was treated for a mild strain/sprain, and then released.

His appropriate use of a safety system and the quick, efficient response of his associates saved his life. Many employees who take a fall at work are not so fortunate. (more…)


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